Euan Uglow

Euan Uglow (English, March 10, 1932–August 31, 2000) became well-known for his still-life and nude paintings. He studied at the Camberwell School of Art from 1948 to 1950. While there, he studied under William Coldstream (British, 1908–1987). When Coldstream left Camberwell to teach at the Slade School of Art in 1951, Uglow followed him, and he stayed at Slade as a student until 1954. Uglow's success in art was slow to develop. He did not sell a painting until he had been out of art school for eight years. During those years, he took part-time teaching jobs, most notably from Slade. He would be associated with Slade for the rest of his life.






 In 1962, one of Uglow's paintings, German Girl, was removed from the municipal art gallery in Bradford, Yorkshire, because it offended decency. He held his first solo show in 1961 at the Beaux Arts Gallery, but his slow method of working limited the solo shows he held over his career. He did take part in many group shows including exhibitions of the London Group and the annual John Moores Prize exhibitions in Liverpool. In 2002, a posthumous retrospective titled Spotlight on Euan Uglow toured around Britain.





 Uglow's paintings, such as Root five Nude and Zagi, were created in a methodical manner. He used many measurements and corrections to create paintings that were not hyperreal but still fairly true to life. His work was so time consuming that he once joked that he began painting one model when she was engaged, was still painting when she got married, and did not finish until she was divorced. His paintings were mostly of the human figures, but he also painted landscapes and still-life works.
Uglow's work can be seen in the collections of many museums including the Arts Council of England, the British Council, the National Museum of Wales, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Uglow died of liver cancer at his home in Wandsworth, London, in 2000. (artnet.com)




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