George Sugarman

George Sugarman (1912–1999) was an American artist working in the mediums of drawing, painting, and sculpture. Often described as controversial and forward-thinking, Sugarman's prolific body of work defies a definitive style. He pioneered the concepts of pedestal-free sculpture and is best known for his large-scale, vividly painted metal sculptures. His innovative approach to art-making lent his work a fresh, experimental approach and caused him to continually expand his creative focus. During his lifetime, he was dedicated to the well-being of young emerging artists, particularly those who embraced innovation and risk-taking in their work. In his will, Sugarman provided for the establishment of The George Sugarman Foundation, Inc.
A 1934 graduate of the City College of New York, Sugarman served in the United States Navy from 1941 to 1945, assigned to the Pacific theater. He resumed his education in Paris, studying with Cubist sculptor Ossip Zadkine. He returned to New York in 1955 at the age of 39 to begin his career as an artist.Wikipedia


Abstract artist Emilio Vedova

Emilio Vedova (9 August 1919 – 25 October 2006) was a modern Italian painter, considered one of the most important to emerge from his country's artistic scene, Arte Informale.Vedova was born in Venice into a working-class family. His artisan roots came from his house painting father. He was the third child out of seven. Emilio began working at a young age, primarily in a factory. Later he got a job in a photography and restoration studio.

He was imperatively a self-taught artist aside from a few night classes. After an initial formative experience within Expressionism, he joined the group "Corrente"(1942–43), during the second world war, which included other artists such as Renato Guttuso and Renato Birolli. He recorded his experience in his drawings. Vedova returned to Venice towards the demise of the war.He participated in the Resistenza and played a key role in the post-war Italian art movement, which was opening up and contributing originally to the European avant-garde. His work was getting much more abstract. His images represented the apprehension of the time, with his geometric shapes, and color palette. In 1946 he co-signed the manifesto Beyond Guernica which included several Italian artists who were to become famous. In 1947 Vedova founded Fronte Nuovo delle Arti,In 1952 he became a member of the influential and more avant garde, Gruppo degli Otto (Afro, Birolli, Corpora, Santomaso, Morlotti, Vedova, Moreni, Turcato), organised by the critic Lionello Venturi. His work exerted a significant influence on the Arte Povera group.

In 1951, Vedova exhibited his first solo show in the United States at the Catherine Viviano Gallery located in New York. This show was where he began to attract big name collectors, like Peggy Guggenheim. In the following year, he was a part of Gruppo degli Otto Pittori Italiani (Group of Eight Italian Painters) a show exhibited at the Venice Biennale. The show was arranged by Lionello Venturi. This show is known to have begun the great art movement recognized as Arte Informale.
He later established a fruitful cooperation with composer Luigi Nono, designing scenographies and costumes for the opera Intolleranza 1960. In 1984 he designed a highly original light setting for Nono's opera Prometeo at La Fenice. Nono dedicated to Vedova his first work for magnetic tape Omaggio a Vedova (1960).
Vedova had a number of gallery and museum exhibitions, at places like the Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Moderna in Rome and the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice. His work has proven to be very successful in auctions.
Vedova spent most of his life in Venice, where he taught at the Accademia di Belle Arti.Wikipedia

Graffiti Pop Art in Manish Aroras Collection

 Manish Arora Fashionshow Winter 2012 Paris

Manish Arora is an Indian fashion designer based in New Delhi. In early 2011, he was appointed creative director of the womenswear collection of the French fashion house Paco Rabanne,although he left the company in May 2012

Abstract expressionism Albert Irvin

Albert Henry Thomas Irvin  (21 August 1922 – 26 March 2015) was an English abstract expressionist painter.
Born in London, during World War II, he was evacuated from there, and upon returning, went to study at the Northampton School of Art between 1940 and 1941, before being conscripted into the Royal Air Force as a navigator. When the war was over, he resumed his course at Goldsmiths College from 1946 to 1950, where he would later go on to teach between 1962 and 1983. He was elected to The London Group in 1955. He worked in studios in the East End of London from 1970 onwards.
Irvin won a major Arts Council Award in 1975 and a Gulbenkian Award for printmaking in 1983.His work was widely exhibited both in the UK and abroad, in such places as Arts Council of Great Britain, Birmingham City Art Gallery, the Chase Manhattan Bank, the Contemporary Art Society, Manchester City Art Gallery, Tate Britain, the Victoria and Albert Museum and Warwick University Arts Centre.
His influences included Walter Sickert, Henri Matisse, JMW Turner, Jack Smith and Edward Middleditch.Irvin was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in the 2013 Birthday Honours for services to the visual arts.Wikipedia

Agustín Cardenas

Agustín Cárdenas Alfonso (April 10, 1927, Matanzas, Cuba – February 9, 2001, Havana, Cuba) was a Cuban sculptor who was active in the Surrealist movement in Paris. His sculpture was influenced by Brâncuși, Henry Moore, and Jean Arp.Poet André Breton said of his artistic hand that it was "efficient as a dragonfly
Cárdenas was a descendant of slaves from Senegal and the Congo, and was born in Matanzas, a major port in the sugar industry. In Cuba, Cárdenas studied under Juan José Sicre, and from 1943 to 1949 at Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes “San Alejandro” in Havana. He was member of Asociación de Grabadores de Cuba (AGC) from 1951 to 1955, and of the creative group Los Once from 1953 to 1955. Cárdenas' work was exhibited several times in 1952 "Pintura Ávila Escultura Cárdenas" at Palacio de los Trabajadores in Havana, and in 1955 he exhibited a selection of his pieces in "Agustín Cárdenas: 20 esculturas" at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de La Habana.

 He settled in Paris in 1955 and in 1957 joined the Surrealist movement there. His work incorporated aspects of his African heritage and of Dogon totems.
In 1987, his work was in the Corea Gallery, Seoul, South Korea. In 1993, his work was exhibited in "Agustín Cárdenas" in the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de La Habana and in 2002, Cárdenas work was presented in "Desires and Grace" at the Haim Chanin Fine Arts Gallery in New York City.
Cárdenas also took part in many group exhibitions such as the IV Exposición Nacional de Pintura, Escultura y Grabado at the Centro Asturiano in Havana in 1950 and the "Exposition Internationale du Surréalisme Eros" at the Galerie Daniel Cordier in Paris in 1960. He participated in the II Bienal Internacional de la Pequeña Escultura in 1973 in Budapest, Hungary and the exhibition of Abstract Art "Tono a Tono" in the Salón de la Solidaridadin the Hotel Habana Libre in Havana in 2000.

 Cárdenas has been awarded with several distinctions during his life, including Segundo Premio VI Salón Nacional de Pintura y Escultura, Salones del Capitolio Nacional, Havana, by the Cuban government (1953) and the Silver Medal XXXVII, Salón de Bellas Artes, Círculo de Bellas Artes, Havana (1955). In 1976, he was awarded with the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in France and the Fujisankey Biennal Prize at the Hakone Open-Air Museum, Fujisankey, Japan. Also in 1995 he received Premio Nacional de Artes Plásticas by the Cuban Ministry of Culture.
His works can be found in many permanent collections around the world, including the Centre National des Arts du Cirque, Fonds National d’Art Contemporain and Musée de la Sculpture en Plein Air in Paris; the Musée d’Art et d’Industrie at Saint-Étienne, France; the Hakone Open-Air Museum, Hakone, Japan; the Musée d’Art Contemporain, Argel, Algeria; Museo de Bellas Artes in Caracas, Venezuela, and in the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de La Habana in Havana, Cuba.Wikipedia

Dolls Greer Lankton

Greer Lankton (1958 – November 18, 1996) was an American artist known for creating lifelike, sewn dolls that were often modeled on friends and celebrities and posed in elaborate theatrical settings. She was a key figure in the East Village art scene of the 1980s in New York.
Greer Lankton was born in Flint, Michigan, to a Presbyterian minister and his wife. It was during her rough childhood as a feminine boy that she began creating dolls. "It was when I was about ten years old ... I used to make dolls out of hollyhocks and all types of flowers. Pipecleaner dolls and things like that. I started taking it seriously by the time I went to college when I was 17."Greer was often teased by peers, and on more than one occasion experienced physical harassment.
Lankton studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and later Pratt Institute in New York. She changed her name and had sexual reassignment surgery at the age of 21, while she was a student at Pratt. She had previously been the subject of a local newspaper article about people transitioning to a new gender.

 Gender and sexuality are recurring themes in Lankton's art. Her dolls are created in the likeness of those society calls "freaks", and have often been compared to the surrealist works of Hans Bellmer, who made surreal dolls with interchangeable limbs. She created figures that were simultaneously distressing and glamorous, as if they were both victim and perpetrator of their existence.
In 1981 Lankton was featured in the seminal "New York/New Wave" exhibition at P.S.1 in Long Island City, and began to show her work in the East Village at Civilian Warfare. She gained an almost cult following among East Village residents from her highly theatrical window displays she designed for Einstein's, the boutique that was run by her husband, Paul Monroe, at 96 East Seventh Street.

 Besides her more emotionally charged dolls, Lankton also created commissioned portrait dolls. These include a 1989 doll of Diana Vreeland that was commissioned for a window display at Barney's  as well as shrines to her icons, such as Candy Darling.
Critic Roberta Smith described her works in the New York Times as: "Beautifully sewn, with extravagant clothes, make-up and hairstyles, they were at once glamorous and grotesque and exuded intense, Expressionistic personalities that reminded some observers of Egon Schiele. They presaged many of the concerns of 90's art, including the emphasis on the body, sexuality, fashion and, in their resemblance to puppets, performance."

 Photographer Nan Goldin said of her work, "Greer was one of the pioneers who blurred the line between folk art and fine art." She had spots in the prestigious Whitney Biennial and the Venice Biennale, both in 1995, where her busts of Candy Darling, circus fat ladies, and dismembered heads gained her notoriety.
In November 2014, "LOVE ME," a major exhibition of Lankton's work including more than 90 dolls, documentation, and ephemera, was mounted at PARTICIPANT, INC in New York City. It was organized by Lia Gangitano in cooperation with G.L.A.M., the Greer Lankton Archives Museum, which was founded by Paul Monroe after her death.Wikipedia